Jelly/Jam/Chutney/Ketchup time!

As the Summer begins to reach it’s crux, I begin to make jam. After waiting all these weeks for the berries, clovers and tomatoes to ripen, the jelly/jam/chutney/ketchup making begins. Some of my favorite jellies include watermelon and red clover. My favorite jams are strawberry and blueberry, and gingered kumquats make the top of my list of preserves.

You may be asking yourself what the difference between jams, jellies, and preserves are, and in truth, there are very few differences. Jellies are created from the juice of a fruit, or a tea made from the flowers or leaves of a plant, as in the case of clover and mint jelly, and jams and preserves contain macerated or sometimes whole fruits; both are cooked with sugar, and often pectin, and then canned. Some fruits contain higher amounts of natural pectin (which is a soluble fiber found in many fruits and is concentrated in apple and citrus skins), such as strawberries and need little or no pectin to set. Although looser than traditional jams, strawberry jam made from just strawberries and honey is a rare and spectacular treat! Here are a few of my favorite recipes using low-sugar pectin, as I believe the flavor of the fruit should be predominate, not the sugar content.

*Before you start any canning adventures I urge all of our readers to review safe the canning information provided by The National Center for Home Food Preservation at

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/.

**All jars, rings, and lids should be sterilized in boiling water before filling.

***Any jars that do not process correctly and have lids that do not pop down in the center after cooling should be refrigerated and used immediately.

Red Clover Jelly

Ingredients:

  • 5 Cups Red Clover Flowers
  • 4 Cups Water***
  • 4 Cups Sugar
  • 1 ½ Boxes Low/No Sugar Pectin

Soak your clover flowers briefly in cool water to help remove any bugs.

Make a tea from the red clovers by boiling the water and adding the clovers. Let this tea steep 6 – 8 hours or overnight if possible.

Strain the clovers out from the tea.

To make your jelly:

Mix your 1 ½ boxes of pectin with ½ cups sugar and set aside.

Bring your red clover tea to a boil in a stainless steel cooking pot.. Add the remaining 3 ½ cups sugar and stir until dissolved.

Mix in your pectin/sugar mixture and bring to a rolling boil for about 5 minutes.

Ladle into sterilized glass jars, screw on lids/rings and process in a boiling water bath for 10 – 15 minutes.

After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

***You can also experiment with using apple juice in place of some or all of the water.

Watermelon Jelly

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cups Watermelon Juice (Usually about a 10 – 15 pound Watermelon)
  • 4 Cups Sugar
  • 1 ½ Boxes Low/No Sugar Pectin

To make your juice:

  • Cut your watermelon into manageable chunks, removing the seeds and the rind. Place chunks in your blender and blend until liquefied.
  • Strain your watermelon pulp though a fine mesh strainer and measure out your 4 cups of juice. Any leftover juice is great for drinking!

To make your jelly:

  • Mix your 1 ½ boxes of pectin with ½ cups sugar and set aside.
  • Bring your watermelon juice to a boil in a stainless steel cooking pot. Add the remaining 3 ½ cups sugar and stir until dissolved.
  • Mix in your pectin/sugar mixture and bring to a rolling boil for about 5 minutes.
  • Ladle into sterilized glass jars, screw on lids/rings and process in a boiling water bath for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

Strawberry Jam

Ingredients:

  • 8 Cups Fresh Strawberries (Mashed down to about 6 Cups)
  • 4 Cups Sugar
  • 1 ½ Boxes Low/No Sugar Pectin

To make your jam:

  • Wash strawberries well, and remove hulls.
  • Mix your 1 ½ boxes of pectin with ½ cups sugar and set aside.
  • Mix the remaining 3 ½ cups sugar with your mashed berries in a stainless steel cooking pot.
  • Bring this mixture to a boil.
  • Add the sugar/pectin mixture and bring to a full rolling boil. Boil for about 5 minutes.
  • Ladle into sterilized glass jars, screw on lids/rings and process in a boiling water bath for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

 

 

Blueberry Jam

Ingredients:

  • 8-9 Cups Fresh Blueberries
  • 4 Cups Sugar
  • 1 ½ Boxes Low/No Sugar Pectin

To make your jam:

  • Wash blueberries well, removing any bugs, stems, etc.
  • Mix your 1 ½ boxes of pectin with ½ cups sugar and set aside.
  • Mix the remaining 3 ½ cups sugar with your mashed berries in a stainless steel cooking pot.
  • Bring this mixture to a boil.
  • Add the sugar/pectin mixture and bring to a full rolling boil. Boil for about 5 minutes.
  • Ladle into sterilized glass jars, screw on lids/rings and process in a boiling water bath for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

 

Preserved Honey Ginger Kumquats

Ingredients:

  • 2 Pounds Kumquats
  • 3 Cups Water
  • 2 ½ Cups Raw Honey
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 3-4 Tablespoons raw grated ginger

To make your preserves:

  • Wash kumquats well, removing any stems.
  • You can either, cut your kumquats in half, leave them whole, or slice them into pinwheels. If you leave them whole you will want to poke holes in them with a knife so that the honey ginger syrup can penetrate into the kumquat.
  • Bring the water, sugar, honey, and ginger to a boil in a large stainless steel cooking pot.
  • Add the kumquats and cook until tender. About 10 – 15 minutes for sliced kumquats, 20-25 minutes for halved kumquats, and 40-45 minutes for whole kumquats.
  • Ladle the kumquats into sterilized glass jars, and cover with syrup.
  • Screw on lids/rings and process in a hot water bath for 10-15 minutes.
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

Tomatoes and Zucchini with Garlic and Basil

Ingredients:

  • 5 Lbs. Zucchini
  • 4 – 5 Lbs. Tomatoes
  • 1 Medium Onion
  • 1 Bulb Garlic (5-6 Large Cloves)
  • 2 – 3 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 1 Large Bunch of Fresh Basil or 3 – 4 Tbps. Dried Basil
  • 1 Small Bunch Fresh Oregano or 2 Tbsp. Dried Oregano
  • 4 Teaspoons Salt + Salt and Pepper to taste

To make your tomato/zucchini mixture:

  • Quickly dip each tomato in boiling water, then in an ice bath to remove the skins.
  • Chop onion and mince garlic. Add these to a sauce pan with a little olive oil and cook until just beginning to get soft.
  • Add the zucchini and cook for about five minutes.
  • Deseed and roughly chop the tomatoes and add to the same saucepan.
  • Add the basil, oregano, and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Cook until flavors are melded, about 5 – 10 minutes.
  • Before canning in your pressure canner, add ½ tsp. salt to each pint jar.
  • Pack your tomato/zucchini mixture into the pint jars, wipe up any spills on the jars and add the lids and screw on the bands.
  • Bring your pressure cooker to pressure. Dial Gauge Type @ 11 pounds pressure or Weighted Gauge Type @ 10 pounds pressure and process pints 30 minutes
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

Tomato Ketchup

Ingredients:

  • 25 Lbs Tomatoes
  • 3 Medium Onions
  • 1 Bulb Garlic
  • 1 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 3 Cups Cider Vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. Celery Seed
  • 1 tsp. Ground Cloves
  • 1 tsp. Dried Mustard
  • 1 ½ Cups Sugar
  • ¼ Cup Salt

To make your ketchup:

  • Quickly dip each tomato in boiling water, then in an ice bath to remove the skins. Deseed them and give them a bit of a squeeze to get out any excess moisture. Crush or chop them. Set aside.
  • Dice onions and garlic and begin cooking down in the olive oil.
  • Add tomatoes and bring to a boil.
  • Add celery seed, ground cloves, and dried mustard and boil for 20 minutes.
  • Add the vinegar and again boil for 15- 20 minutes.
  • Add the salt and sugar and cook down until reduced by nearly half, or to your desired thickness.
  • When desired consistency is reached, ladle the hot ketchup into pint jars and process 15 – 20 minutes in a hot water bath.
  • After processing, remove jars immediately, place on a rack to cool.

 

 

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15 Responses to Jelly/Jam/Chutney/Ketchup time!

  1. Bob Minnocci says:

    You folks perform a great service with all of your supportive suggestions, tips, recipes. Thank you for a fine newsletter.

  2. Try Pomona’s Pectin for low/no sugar jams and jellies. I wanted to reduce the amount of sugar in my jams and switched to Pomona’s. Now I can taste the fruit not the sugar!

    http://www.pomonapectin.com/

  3. Em Smith says:

    Is the Mint jelly made the same way as the red clover? i have a ton of mint but hardly any red clover hopefully more next year. been gathering all summer

    • High Mowing Organic Seeds says:

      Yes, it is! Some people do put green food coloring in the jelly to make it look “minty”…

  4. michele says:

    Could you tell me how many pints the ketchup recipe makes?

  5. I’m going to try the kumquat preserves. Sounds wonderful.
    I developed a recipe that I love and people rave about it. Here it is–enjoy! Denice

    Cranberry Orange Marmalade
    Ingredients:

    2 Tea. Grated Fresh Ginger
    12 oz (one bag) fresh Cranberries
    2 Oranges
    2 cups Water
    5 cups Cane Sugar (Beet sugar contains sulfites)
    1 package Pectin
    In a large stainless steel pot bring to boil then simmer the water, ginger, and cranberries. Finely chop the orange rinds and slice the orange fruit and add this to the pot, simmering another 10 minutes. Add the sugar and bring to a rolling boil for one minute. Add the Certo and bring to a rolling boil for an additional minute. This year I’m using the Pomona as Certo also contains sulfites and I’m allergic to them. Find it at your local Co-op or health food store.

    Dispense the marmalade into pre-sterilized glass jars which were kept in a hot water bath.

    Makes about 6 cups.

  6. Cathy says:

    Is 1 1/2 boxes 2 boxes with 1 box measured in half? Sorry I’m new to this.
    Cathy

    • High Mowing Organic Seeds says:

      Yes, 1 1/2 boxes is 1 full box and 1/2 of another box. I don’t even
      measure it, I just sprinkle about 1/2 the package in. If this seems like
      it is not enough, or too much, adjust to your liking. Recipes are more
      guidelines, as each berry you use will have a different amount of
      moisture. For example cultivated blueberries and wild blueberries have
      vastly different amounts of water in them, so for wild blueberries you
      may need less pectin, and for cultivated blueberries you may need a
      little more pectin due to the higher amount of water in the berries. – Amber

  7. chris says:

    Tomato & Zucchini with Garlic & Basil Recipe: Would to just freeze this recipe, also will be using canned tomatoes as there are no fresh tomatoes this year in our area. Need your thoughts.

    • High Mowing Organic Seeds says:

      I’ve never tried freezing it, but if you do, let us know how it tastes
      after being defrosted and reheated. IT seems to me that freezing may
      make it a bit watery after defrosting, but I could be wrong. Also, I bet
      canned tomatoes would work great, and you probably won’t have to cook it
      down as long after adding them! – Amber

  8. Md.AMINUL ISLAM says:

    HI,I want to manufacturing tomato sous.and Ketchup and various Jelly,Jam, Chutney. please kindly inform me in manufacturing process follow and list of machinery and their function including machinery
    picture. if immediately reply me its great help for me. Thanks

    • Amber Gillespie says:

      Hi Md. Aminul Islam,
      All of the directions are included in the recipes. The recipes are for home gardener use. I am not a manufacturer and would have no idea of what type of machinery you would need to produce mass quantities. Good luck!
      Thanks,
      Amber

  9. Stevie Loury says:

    Celery is a long-season crop that can be tricky to grow, some might say, the trickiest of all. It likes fertile soil, cool temperatures, and constant moisture. It will not tolerate heat and can be hard to transplant. Summer crops in the north and winter crops in the south make celery a year-round producer. All the work is worth it when you harvest crunchy, green stalks.-:.^

    Hottest brief article on our personal online site
    http://www.calaguas.org/

  10. Santo Hillier says:

    Modern scientific tests have shown that red clover contains isoflavones, plant-based chemicals that produce estrogen like effects in the body. Isoflavones have shown potential in the treatment of a number of conditions associated with menopause, such as hot flashes, cardiovascular health, and osteoporosis. However, as researchers have become aware of the side effects of taking estrogen, there is also some concern about the safety of isoflavones. Plus, evidence that red clover helps reduce any menopausal symptoms — like hot flashes — is mixed.”‘-*

    Check out our own blog as well
    <http://healthwellnessbook.com

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