Pest, Disease, and Weed Resources in the Information Age

The ceaseless challenge posed by pest, disease, and weed pressure in our vegetable fields can be disheartening at best. As we patiently tend to our crops through the summer months, it’s important to take a moment to observe and learn about what we’re up against. In today’s world of instant access and boundless information, there’s no need to go it alone. Below we have listed some of the finest resources on the web for researching insect and animal pests, disease prevention and control, and weed identification.

PESTS: Lions, and tigers, and bugs…oh my!

  • The University of California IPM Program has an amazing array of information on the many different types of pests that can affect our crops, including life cycle information and deterrent information. http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/veggies.html
  • The National Center for Appropriate Technology has a great series of pest management fact sheets. Some of them are free, others you have to pay to download – though it’s worth noting that they are willing to accommodate farmers who aren’t able to afford their fees. https://attra.ncat.org/pest.html

 

DISEASE: Did you ever want to be a doctor when you grew up?

 

WEEDS: Identification tools for the 21st century.

Hopefully these resources will aid you in the removal of unwanted visitors (of all shapes and types) in your growing area!

This entry was posted in Beginner Gardeners' Guide, Growing Tips, Plant Diseases, Plant Pests. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Pest, Disease, and Weed Resources in the Information Age

  1. Pingback: Pest, Disease, and Weed Resources in the Information Age | High … | Gardening Pest

  2. Jan says:

    Hi, my collards, brussel sprouts and cabbage plants have been invaded with a small black bug…from looking online, they look to be a black flea beetle. Do you have any recommendations on how to reduce if not get rid of these pesky things?
    Thank you,
    Jan

    • High Mowing Organic Seeds says:

      Hi Jan, we apologize for the late answer – hope you still have some crops left after all the flea beetle damage! Flea beetles have been particularly bad this year. Here’s an article on Flea Beet Management: http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/factsheets/fleabeetle.html – and also, if you look on our Facebook page there was a good discussion on alternate methods of dealing with flea beetles (you make have to scroll down the page to find the discussion). If you aren’t selling your veggies (so you wouldn’t want all the holes for cosmetic purposes), then the plants should be fine – just holey.

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