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High Mowing Organic Seeds
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How To Grow Sprouts

Why Sprout? Types of Sprouts and Recommended Sprouting Methods
How Do I Grow Sprouts? Frequently Asked Questions
Sprouting Methods Sprout Recipes







Why Sprout?


Fresh homegrown sprouts are a delicious, healthy, easy-to-grow crop that can be produced indoors all year round. Growing sprouts does not require any special expertise and almost no special equipment (not even soil!), and they can be grown where space is very limited. Those interested in eating a “localvore” diet may find sprouts appealing because they can help reduce the need for imported fresh produce after the growing season ends in cold northern climates. They are a fun crop to grow with kids, since the short time between germination and harvest helps keep kids interested in the process. They can provide an array of vitamins and minerals, are live, raw, and vegan, naturally low in fat, and always cholesterol free. A number of studies have been conducted in recent years on the possible health benefits of this nutrient-dense food, with particular interest in broccoli sprouts. According to a 2007 article in the International Journal of Applied Science,

“Sprouts have naturally occurring levels of nutrients higher than any whole food. Plant seeds contain the embryo and stored food reserves. When under favourable conditions the seeds begin to germinate, the food reserves are mobilized. The fats are transformed into free fatty acids, starch into maltose and proteins into free amino acids. At this stage, some other very important nutrients start coming up in the growing seed, such as vitamins, enzymes and phytonutrients. The latter include substance families like flavonoids, saponins, monoterpenes, phytosterols and isothiocyanates. Members of these families are shown to have a beneficial effect on health or an active role in the amelioration of disease. Sprouts that are a few days old have the highest concentration of phytonutrients per calorie of any food.”

Disclaimer: Sprouted seeds are a food, not a drug, and are not intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, or treat any disease.



How do I Grow Sprouts?

There are a number of different methods for sprouting, and different types of sprouters as well. Some sprouters work better than others for different types of sprouts. We offer 4 different types of sprouts:

Sprout Type
Our Varieties
Recommended Methods
Leafy Alfalfa, Red Clover, Broccoli, Fenugreek, China Rose Radish, Sandwich Booster Mix
Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray
Brassicas Broccoli, Broccoli Blend, China Rose Radish, Sandwich Booster Mix, Spicy Salad Mix
Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray
Beans Ancient Eastern Mix, Crunchy Bean Mix, Mung Beans, Spicy Salad Mix Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray, Hemp Bag
Greens Alfalfa, Red Clover, Sandwich Booster Mix, Spicy Salad Mix
Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray


A Word About Food Safety

Our certified organic, Non-GMO Project Verified sprouting seeds are available throughout the country and we take the safe handling of our sprouting seeds very seriously.

Our process:
1) We test every lot of our sprouting seeds to ensure a high germination rate and freedom from pathogens like Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli.
2) Our sprouting seeds are packed and sealed in a food safe facility following strict food safety protocols.
3) We take sealed samples from each packing run and send them to an independent lab to test again for any contamination with pathogens. We do not ship to our customers until we get the pathogen-free test results back.
4) Each package has lot and batch tracking codes for full product traceability.
5) We have a recall protocol in place if an issue ever arises.



Sprouting Methods

Jar-Lid Method:

This is the simplest and cheapest method for sprouting. Any standard wide-mouth jar can be used together with a sprouting screen, sprout jar lid, or a small piece of tulle and a rubber band. To follow the basic method below, first check the back of your sprout package or our listings below for variety-specific directions:
  • Place 1-2 Tbsp of sprouting seeds in a clean wide-mouth jar
  • Place the sprouting screen and ring, sprout lid, or tulle and rubber band over the top of the jar
  • Fill the jar with water and then pour off to rinse seed
  • Fill jar with water and let soak for 4-12 hours, depending on the type of sprouts
  • Drain water, then rinse with water twice each day for 5 days until sprouts are finished
  • Store sprout jar in a bowl, tilted at an angle so any excess water drains out through the screen. Sprouts should be moist, not sitting in water
  • Once sprouts have grown to be an inch or so long and have formed very small leaves called cotyledons, the sprouts are ready for greening. Just place the jar in bright indirect light and they will turn green over the course of a day.
  • Enjoy your fresh sprouts on sandwiches, salads and more!
  • Store sprouts in the refrigerator for up to a week. If not stored in an airtight container, rinse sprouts with water each day to keep them moist.

Pros of the Jar-Lid Method:
• Easy
• Affordable
• Works very well for most seeds

Cons of the Jar-Lid Method:
• Less airflow and drainage than other sprouters
• Doesn’t work as well for gelatinous seeds (such as arugula, canola, and mustards), which may clog the screen and prevent water from draining out properly

Sprouting Tray Method:

This is another simple method that allows you to produce several different types of sprouts at the same time. Sprouting trays, like the SproutMaster and Bioset Germinator are usually plastic and stackable. They have multiple chambers with perforated bottoms to allow water to drain through and are modular, allowing you to grow as many different types of sprouts at once as you wish. With some models the bottom becomes the lid for storage. To follow the basic method below, first check the back of your sprout package or our listings below for variety-specific directions:
  • Cover the bottom of the sprouting tray with one single layer of seed.
  • Place the tray and seeds in a dish of water and soak for required time. (Alternatively, once you've measured your seeds in the tray, you can put the seeds in a bowl, fill the bowl with water, and soak for required time. Drain well.)
  • Twice a day, rinse the seeds. Either rinse under a tap of running water, or use a spray bottle to mist well. Tip the tray to the side to drain well.
  • Refrigerate to store once sprouts are ready. Sprouts can be refrigerated for up to a week in a sealed container. (Sprouts store best when they are fairly dry- do not store immediately after rinsing.)
  • NOTE: The Bioset Germinator contains a siphon system which automatically adjusts the water level and humidity in each chamber. Ideally one should simply fill the top chamber with water twice daily. However, it is recommended to drain each tray individually to ensure proper drainage.
Pros of the Sprout Tray Method:
• Fairly Easy
• Good airflow
• Excellent for most sprouts

Cons of the Sprout Tray Method:
• More expensive than Jar-Lid method
• Less space for taller sprouts like mung beans
• More difficult to clean than with the Jar-Lid method, use a vegetable brush.

Hemp Bag

Many companies offer hemp bags for growing sprouts. These are primarily intended for sprouting beans, nuts, and grains, as delicate leafy sprouts can be easily damaged without the protection of a solid container. The bag must be tightly woven for sprouting small seeds. To follow the basic method below, first check the back of your sprout package or our listings below for variety-specific directions:

  • Place desired quantity of seed in bag.
  • Place bag in a bowl of water and remove to rinse.
  • Replace bag in a bowl of water to soak for desired time.
  • Remove bag from water and hang over sink for drip drying.
  • Rinse under the tap or in a bowl of water three times daily until sprouts are ready.
  • Sprouts can be stored in bag in refrigerator if placed inside a plastic bag; or remove and place sprouts in an airtight container.
  • Store sprouts for up to a week, rinsing daily.
  • Remove any stuck roots when sprouts are harvested.

Pros of the Hemp Bag:
• Best airflow and drainage of any sprouter
• Ideal for humid climates
• Great for traveling
• Easy to clean in the washing machine

Cons of the Hemp Bag:
• Not suitable for smaller seeds unless bag is tightly woven
• Not suitable for Chinese-style (2-3”) mung bean sprouts
• Bag dries out more quickly than other sprouters; more rinsing is required


Types of Sprouts & Recommended Methods


Alfalfa 1700
• A very easy sprout with mild, fresh flavor.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 4-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Easy Sprouter, or Sprouting Tray
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 3-4 cups

Ancient Eastern Blend 1710

• A beautiful crunchy sprout mix with fenugreek, lentils, kamut and adzuki beans.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 3 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray, Easy Sprouter, Hemp Bag
• Yield: ½ cup seed = 2 ½ cups sprouts

Broccoli Blend 1705

• An easy, antioxidant-rich mix of broccoli, broccoli raab, canola, radish, mustard, and arugula with spicy flavor. NOTE: This mix contains gelatinous seeds that may clog the screen in the Jar-Lid method.
• Soaking Time: 2 hours (NOTE: soaking longer than 3 hours will kill brassicas)
• Sprouting time: 4-5 days
• Recommended methods: Sprouting Tray or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 3-4 cups

Broccoli 1707

• An easy, nutritious sprout with spicy flavor.
• Soaking Time: 2 hours (NOTE: soaking longer than 3 hours will kill brassicas)
• Sprouting time: 3-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray, or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 3-4 cups

China Rose Radish 1712
• An beautiful pink and green sprout with spicy radish flavor.
• Soaking Time: 2 hours
• Sprouting time: 2-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray, or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 1 ½ cups

Crunchy Bean Mix 1703

• A high-protein, nutty, crunchy mix of peas, garbanzo beans, and lentils.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 3-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Sprouting Tray, Hemp Bag, or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: ½ cup seed = 2 ½ cups

Fenugreek 1704

• Large, vigorous sprouts with unusual flavor; traditionally used in Indian cooking.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 3-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Easy Sprouter or Sprouting Tray
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 1-2 cups

Mung Beans 1728

• The world’s most popular sprout, with delicious flavor and juicy texture. NOTE: mung beans must be grown in darkness to avoid bitterness.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 2 days for short sprouts, 5-6 days for Chinese style
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid, Easy Sprouter, Hemp Bag, or Sprouting Tray
• Yield: ½ cup seed = 2 ½ cups

Red Clover 1711

• A very easy sprout with mild, sweet flavor and delicate crunch.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 4-5 days
• Recommended methods: Jar-Lid or Sprouting Tray
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 3-4 cups

Sandwich Booster Mix 1702
• Easy sprout mix of clover, alfalfa, radish, and mustards; mild, sweet, and spicy. NOTE: This mix contains gelatinous seeds that may clog the screen in the Jar-Lid method.
• Soaking Time: 8 hours
• Sprouting time: 3-5 days
• Recommended methods: Sprouting Tray or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 3-4 cups

Spicy Salad Mix 1701

• Spicy blend of lentils, alfalfa, red clover, radish, canola and black mustard. NOTE: This mix contains gelatinous seeds that may clog the screen in the Jar-Lid method.
• Soaking Time: 6-8 hours
• Sprouting time: 3-6 days
• Recommended methods: Sprouting Tray or Easy Sprouter
• Yield: 1 Tbsp = 2-3 cups



Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are the easiest sprouts to grow?
A: Most varieties are pretty easy, but the simplest and fastest varieties are Red Clover, Alfalfa, Crunchy Bean Mix, and Ancient Eastern Blend.

Q: A lot of my seeds never sprouted – what is the problem?
A: This is a sign that the seeds have been waterlogged and were not drained properly. Make sure that sprouts are thoroughly drained after each rinse. If using trays, be careful to tip the trays and bounce lightly against the heel of your hand to remove excess water.

Q: Are my broccoli sprouts supposed to be stinky?

A: Brassicas produce a compound called sulfurophane which gives off a sulfur-like smell when they’re sprouted. It is ok if they smell slightly sulfurous. To reduce the smell, spend more time draining your sprouts. Brassica seeds are very small and drown easily if not well-drained.

Q: I see tiny fibers in my sprouts! Are they moldy?

A: Chances are your sprouts are not actually moldy. What you are seeing are the tiny root hairs coming off the main sprout. Brassica, radish, and grain seeds all produce these root hairs when conditions are a little too dry. You will notice that they seem to disappear after rinsing; the water makes them stick to the main sprout. Try rinsing more often if you see them. It is possible for mold to appear on sprouts that are old or not receiving enough air-circulation. Mold appears as green or black fuzz, as opposed to white. Make sure to keep your sprouts in a place where they will get plenty of air movement, drain carefully, and sterilize your sprouter after every few batches.

Q: Do I need to de-hull my sprouts before eating them, and how do I do it?

A: Hulls are the protective “coats” that form the outer layer of the seed, most noticeable on mung bean sprouts. You do not need to de-hull any of our varieties. The hulls add more fiber and nutrients. However, if you prefer hulless sprouts you can stir the finished sprouts in cold water, then skim the lighter hulls off the top.

Q: What is the best way to store my seeds so they still have good germination?

A: Keeping your seeds in the refrigerator in a moisture-proof container can greatly extend their lives. Most of our seeds will last for years at room temperature, but this is the best way to ensure they do. You can also put them in the freezer for long-term storage.

Q: What is the best way to store my finished sprouts?

A: As with any fresh food, store sprouts in the refrigerator. The tricky part is to make sure they don’t get too wet or too dry. To keep them just right, you can place them in a plastic or glass container with the lid just slightly ajar. The SproutMaster trays are intended for this purpose, and come with a lid and base that helps them stay fresh in storage. If using the Jar-Lid method, simply drain your sprouts once they are finished and put the jar with its sprouting lid in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator. Sprouts will keep for about one week in the fridge. If kept in a container that is not airtight, continue rinsing sprouts daily to keep them from drying out in the low humidity of the refrigerator.

Q: Are the sprout seeds sold by High Mowing tested for pathogens?
A: High Mowing takes the safe handling of these seeds very seriously. Each and every lot of our sprouting seeds is microbial-tested to be free of pathogens like listeria, salmonella, and e coli. Our sprouting seeds are packed at the Vermont Food Venture Center, a food packing facility in Hardwick, VT. After they are filled with seeds, the bags are heat-sealed to maintain quality once they leave the certified kitchen.



Recipes

New England Winter Slaw by Megen Hall
A Winter Salad Recipe to Make Your Mouth Sing!


Salad:

• 5-6 stems Kale, spine removed and chopped
• 1 cup finely chopped green cabbage (or 1/2 cup green plus 1/2 cup red)
• 1 cup spinach, chopped
• 1 cup shoots (your choice)
• 1 cup sprouts (your choice)
• 1 apple, cored and chopped
• 1 small red onion, minced
• 2 carrots, grated
• ½ cup lightly toasted chopped walnuts (or pumpkin seeds are equally delicious)
• ½ tsp salt
• (optional: dried fruit, like cranberries or raisins)

Dressing:

• ½ cup mayonnaise
• 1 T maple syrup
• Ό cup balsamic vinegar
• 2-3 T olive oil

Begin by chopping the walnuts to your liking and either gently toast them in a toaster oven or in a skillet over light heat, stirring frequently until they are lightly toasted. Remove from heat and let them cool. Next, prepare the kale by removing the spine and chop into bite sized pieces. Place chopped kale into a large salad bowl and sprinkle evenly with salt (this will help to release the juices when massaging). After it has sat a few minutes, vigorously massage the kale for about 2-3 minutes, or until it looks as if it has been cooked and moisture can be squeezed out of it. Then add all of the chopped greens, apples, red onion, and carrot and toss. Top with toasted nuts or seeds.

I use a small mason jar to make the dressing so that I can cap and refrigerate if I do not use it all. Combine mayonnaise and maple syrup and stir until it is evenly mixed. Add balsamic vinegar and whisk with a fork or tiny wire whisk. When it is thoroughly blended, with no mayo clumps, slowly add in the olive oil as you continue to whisk, until you have reached your desired dressing consistency. Sometimes I mix the dressing and the salad together and serve this way, but only if I know we will eat the whole thing that night. If I expect to have leftovers, I will serve it to add per serving. Store any uneaten salad in an air tight container. It will keep well for 3 or 4 days in the refrigerator.

Crunchy Bean Mix Hummus Recipe from Mumm’s Sprouting Seeds
A nutritious raw humus with the fresh earthy flavours of peas, garbanzons and lentils.

• 2 cups sprouted Crunchy Bean Mix
• 1 clove garlic
• 1 lemon, juiced
• 2 tsp tahini
• 1/2 tsp sea salt
• 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Boil a small pot of water. Remove from heat and let stand 1 minute. Place sprouts in water and let stand for one minute. Drain. This softens the sprouts and gives the hummus a creamy texture. Puree the sprouts, garlic clove(s), lemon juice, tahini, and salt in a blender or food processor. Drizzle in the olive oil until you have a smooth creamy texture. Serve with fresh veggies, or sprouted sunflower shoots!


Sprouted Beans and Rice Recipe from SproutPeople.org
A very simple, satisfying, and nutritious recipe.

Make a pot of rice. While the rice is cooking, mix up some Gomasio, a staple condiment of Japanese cuisine. Gomasio is made from Ό cup toasted sesame seeds and ½ Tbs sea salt. Throw a handful of Crunchy Bean Mix sprouts into the rice pot for the last 2-5 minutes of cooking, or mix in the sprouts when the rice is done. Serve mixture in bowls and sprinkle Gomasio over the top.

Gil's Sprout Fried Rice Recipe from SproutPeople.org

Ingredients:

• 1 cup white rice (basmati or jasmine)
• 2/3 cup coconut milk
• 1 1/3 cups water
• 2 Tbs. oil (corn, peanut, or vegetable.)
• 1 Tbs. soy sauce
• 1/4 tsp. sugar
• 8-16 oz. Crunchy Bean Mix sprouts

Preparation:
• Combine the rice with the water and coconut milk. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until rice is done.
• Heat a skillet or wok over high heat for 1 minute, add oil and heat until smoking.
• Toss in Sprouted Beans and stir fry for 1-2 minutes.
• Add rice, soy sauce and sugar and continue stir frying for 2-3 minutes.
• Remove from heat and eat.
• Serves two.


Herbed Sprout Snack
For snacking or adding to a stir-fry or rice.

Ingredients:
• 1-5 lbs Crunchy Bean Mix sprouts
• 1 tbs. ground oregano
• 1 tbs. ground basil
• 1 tbs. ground thyme
• 1 tsp. pepper
• 1 tsp. garlic powder
• 1 tsp. onion powder
• 1 tsp. ground rosemary
• 1 tsp. ground marjoram
• 1 tsp. olive oil per pound of sprouts

Preparation:
• Mix all ingredients together.
• Sprinkle parmesan cheese on top.
• Mix and Eat/Serve.


Blogs
http://www.highmowingseeds.com/The-Seed-Bin-December-2010.html#sprouts

Food Safety

http://sprouting.com/index.php/sprouts-microgreens/sprouting-at-home/sprouts-health-and-safety.html

http://sprouting.com/index.php/sprouts-microgreens/commercial-sprouting/sanitation.html

Nutrition
http://sproutpeople.org/growing-sprouts/sprout-nutrition/

Links
http://www.highmowingseeds.com/organic-sprouts-and-shoots-growing-and-seed-saving-info.html
http://www.highmowingseeds.com/blog/sprouts-and-shoots-for-the-love-of-a-winter-salad/


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Non GMO Project Verified USDA Organics Vermont Organics Copyright 2014 High Mowing Organic Seeds. All Rights Reserved.
76 Quarry Road :: Wolcott, VT 05680 :: phone: 802-472-6174 :: fax: 802-472-3201
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