Greenhouses

  1. 7 Resources for Season Extension

    All growers are familiar with the guessing game that happens each fall when cool weather comes around: when is the first hard freeze going to hit this year? As the global climate continues to shift in unpredictable ways, the things we as growers thought we knew about our regions’ ecological rhythms are being thrown to the wind (so to speak...
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  2. Best Practices for Early Season Seedling Propagation

    I love this time of year.  Outside the snow is still piling up, but inside we’re sowing seeds.  It feels like a giddy secret—the smell of soil, the germinating seeds and the unfurling of true leaves, while outside the plow is rumbling down the road and every non-farmer is wondering how long winter will last. Okay, every farmer is wondering...
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  3. Micros for Everyone

    An interview with Anne and Brian Bates of Bear Creek Organic Farm on year-round microgreens production in Petoskey, Michigan How did you determine that microgreens production was right for your farm? Three years ago, we were brainstorming new products that would complement our existing year-round greens production. After we saw growers at other markets selling them successfully, we tried two...
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  4. Photoperiodism: How Day Length Affects Plant Growth

    If you reside somewhere north of the equator but south of the north pole, you may have noticed the shortening and darkening of our days lately. In fact, the days have been getting shorter ever since June. Shorter days with less sunlight coincide with cooling temperatures and increased precipitation, all of which hinder plant growth and maturity to a certain...
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  5. Crop Talk: Greenhouse Tomatoes & Cucumbers

    Bartelly F1 cherry tomatoes. To get the most out of valuable greenhouse real estate, you need the guarantee of a strong performance. High Mowing is dedicated to offering high quality genetics for tomato and cucumber seed with varieties developed for strong performances in protected culture. For a long season of crowd-pleasing cherry tomatoes, our growers love Sakura F1, a uniform...
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  6. Crop Talk: A Season of Lettuce Production at High Ledge Farm

    Paul Betz checking on lettuces at High Ledge Farm No matter where you grow, our high quality lettuce varieties mean a consistent supply all season long. I really like that we offer all the classic market standards, as well as a number of specialty varieties that are exciting visually or offer a unique eating experience. Together they make up an...
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  7. Sweet Success: How to Choose [and Grow] Tomatoes & Peppers

    Choose your own adventure! No matter where you grow, it’s important to select tomato and pepper varieties that are well-adapted to your region and conditions. If you grow in Alaska, you’ll need to choose short season varieties that will mature and produce quickly. If you’re a Floridian, you need the opposite—varieties that produce over a long season even when temperatures...
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  8. Growing Partners: Good Water Farms

    This article is part of Growing Partners, our new series focusing on the farmers, gardeners, seed growers, breeders, vendors and non-profits we work with that are demonstrating leadership in environmental and social stewardship. We’re so invigorated by their trail-blazing work, we want to share it with the world–and hopefully inspire the real food leaders of tomorrow to follow in their footsteps...
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  9. The Cure All: A Guide to Curing Vegetables for Winter Storage

    As gardening grows in popularity, people are figuring out all sorts of clever ways to get their homegrown vegetables to keep through the winter. Now that root cellars have become a rarity, many companies offer a range of storage tools and other items that can help. But creating the perfect storage environment for a particular crop is only half the...
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  10. Time to Plant Fall Onions for Overwintering!

    It’s a little-known fact that many seasoned gardeners aren't aware of: you can grow onions (and shallots) in the winter. These super-hardy plants can survive incredibly cold temperatures with a little protection, and provide quality bulbs even after they bolt in the spring. As with most fall-planted crops, success is mostly a matter of timing. Walla Wallas can be harvested...
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