High Mowing Organic Non-GMO Seeds

  1. Excellent Tomato Varieties for High Tunnel Production

    Season extension has become standard practice among farmers and many home gardeners across the country.  Growing tomatoes in a high tunnel or hoop-house extends the season by providing protection from frost and maintaining warmer temperatures that allow for earlier harvest.  High tunnels and greenhouses also provide a protected growing environment for plants which increases the potential for higher yields and...
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  2. Trialing True Potato Seed

    In the High Mowing Organic Seeds' trials field, we spend our time trialing and evaluating varieties to determine how they perform compared with each other, as well as to gain knowledge about their characteristics to determine whether we would like to carry a new variety. In addition to this, we often do custom trials for other growers or organizations.  One...
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  3. Treating Our Tools with TLC

    It’s so easy to simply hang your shovel on the nail when you hang up your proverbial towel at the end of the growing season, but there are a few simple practices that will help to preserve quality tools for decades of use.  The following tool care steps can also be used during the growing season for routine maintenance. Many...
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  4. A narrative on Roy’s Calais Flint Corn - by Brigitte Derel

    It is early evening in Central Vermont, the sun is setting in the distance, and the aroma of fresh cut hay fills the air. As my hands quickly work, shucking a mix of dry ears of golden yellow and deep maroon flint corn, my mind wanders through thoughts of sustenance and sustainability.  I have been waiting just over ninety days...
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  5. A Well-Rounded Squash: The Butternuts

    Autumn without butternut squash is like foliage without color.  T’is the season to be enjoying this versatile, curvaceous squash.  At High Mowing, we sell three varieties of butternut squash  - you may have grown one or more of them this year.  If you did, we would love to know how they did for you.  If not, read on – and...
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  6. Seed Viability Chart

    Ever wondered how long you can save your seeds and have them still be viable? We've created this chart to help you determine the longevity of your seeds. Proper seed storage conditions are cool and dark. The moisture content within the seed greatly affects germination rates. Seeds should be stored in their original packaging in a cool (below 50 degrees...
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  7. Butternut Squash and Cheddar Bread Pudding

    In my childhood home, our holidays were vegetarian affairs, much to the shock of my Ohio suburban friends. Even now after embracing an omnivorous life, the turkey centerpiece of the traditional holiday meal isn’t what I look forward to most about the meal. The vegetable sides are where the action is in my opinion and this recipe is one of...
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  8. Notes from the 2011 Trials Field

    As the night-time temperatures continue to drop here in Northern Vermont, we’ve pretty much wrapped things up in our 4-acre Trials Garden.  Once the crops are harvested, the cover crops planted and the fields cleaned up, it’s time to sit down to compile trials reports on all of the varieties we evaluated over the course of the season, drawing conclusions...
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  9. Pies For People/Soup for Supper

    Once again, High Mowing Organic Seeds is participating in the "Pies for People/Soup for Supper" event put on by The Center for an Agricultural Economy and Sterling College.  Every year High Mowing donates winter squashes that we have grown in our production and trials fields. We bring the squash over to Pete's Greens, where the seeds are removed (and saved...
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  10. Trials Program Conclusions - Organic Beans!

    (Top Row) Provider, Bronco, Strike, Jade, Tavera, Maxibel (Bottom Row) Pension, Dragon Lingerie, Royal Burgundy We’ve been working on compiling the results of our 45 variety trials that were conducted at our 4-acre Trials Garden in Wolcott, Vermont.  The results are interesting – sometimes surprising – and always fun in terms of identifying standout varieties for future introduction to the...
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